Convent of Las Claras

Convent of Las Claras

The Royal Monastery of Santa Clara appears in the will of D. Jerónimo Briceño of Mendoza in 1590. The works began in 1719, finally being finished due to the economic difficulties in 1756, coinciding with the installation of the religion. The original solarium occupied the space between the present streets of Plaza de la Constitution, Mariana and Marin to the juntion with Lectoral Sirvent. The opening of Jovellanos Street in the garden area brought about the creation of a new facade for the building (the principal), and the disappearance of the orchard and nursing convent. Similarly, the rebuilding of the Plaza de la Constitution between 1842-1846, lead to the disappearance of the main facade of the assembly and its adopting a uniform look for the buildings within the remainder of the Plaza.

The convent, since its construction goes through various changes of fortune. The first transformation dates back to 1811, when the street Jovellanos on the primitive grounds opens. In 1837, it was sold off, and there settled the Civil Government and the Provincial Government. This change caused the nuns of the Convent of the Pure to have to move. The most tragic change however for the convent was during the Spanish Civil War when it was torched. The church survived as the only original element, and the convent was since be reconstructed following the war.

At its main facade of Jovellanos street, the main entrance of the houses reveals a semicircular arch of molded thread between two half columns on plinth, supporting an architrave, frieze, and cornice crowned with a curved pediment to host the sculpted figure of Santa Clara in an alcove . The gateway is located in Mariana Street.

MONUMENTS WITH SUITABLE ACCESS FOR THE HANDICAPPED
Address: Jovellanos Street, 04003 Almería

Phone: 950 234 692

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